Tag Archives: arduino

Spork factory

A system for creating an abundance of useless software for tiny devices. Spork Factory evolves programs that run on Atmel processors – the same make as found on the Arduino, in this case the ATtiny85 – a £2.50 8 pin 8bit CPU. I’m currently simply using a piezo speaker as an output and evolving programs based on the frequency of the sound produced by flipping the pins up and down, so creating 2bit synths using the Fourier transform as the fitness function. With more hardware (input as well as output) perhaps we could evolve small robots, or even maybe cheap claytronics or programmable matter experiments.

This project reuses the previous genetic programming experiments (including jgap as its genetic algorithm framework), and is also inspired by Till Bovermann’s recent work with Betablocker in Supercollider for bytecode synthesis.

The programs generated don’t use the Atmel instruction set directly, but interpret a custom one derived from Betablocker for two reasons. Atmel processors separate their instruction memory from data (the Harvard architecture) which makes it difficult to modify code as it’s running (either uploading new evolved code or running self modifying instructions), the other is that using a simplified custom instruction set makes it easier for genetic algorithms to create all kinds of strange programs that will always run.

I’ve added an ‘OUT’ instruction, which pops the top of the stack and writes it to the pins on the ATtiny, so the first thing a program needs to do is generate and output some data. The second thing it needs to do is create an oscillator to create a tone, after that the fitness function grades the program on the amount of frequencies present in the sound, encouraging it to make richer noises.

Here are two example programs from a single run, first the ancestor, a simple oscillator which evolved after 4 or 5 generations:

out
out
nop
nop
dec
nop
nop
nop
out
nop
jmpz 254
nop
nop
nop
dup

It’s simply outputting 0’s, then using the ‘dec’ to decrement the top of the stack to make a 255 which sets the rightmost bit to 1 (the one the speaker is attached to) and then loops with the ‘jmpz’ causing it to oscillate. This program produces this fft plot:

After 100 or so further generations, this descendant program emerges. The dec is replaced by ‘pshl 81’ which does the same job (pushes the literal value 81 onto the stack, setting our speaker bit to 1) but also uses a ‘dup’ (duplicate top of the stack) to shuffle the values around to make a more complex output signal with more frequencies present:

out
out
not
nop
pshl 81
pshi 149
out
nop
out
nop
dup
psh 170
jmp 0

Some further experiments, and perhaps even sound samples soon…