Tag Archives: biology

Mongoose 2000: Group composition

I’ve recently been building the Mongoose 2000 “group composition” tool that the researchers will use for recording information about a whole pack of mongooses (and synchronise data via a Raspberry Pi providing a local wifi node) in their field site in Uganda. As I wrote a bit about before, one of the interesting things about this project is that the interface design has to focus on long term speed and flexibility over immediate ease of use. In this way it seems appropriate that it’s moving in the direction of a musical interface rather than a normal touch screen interface. The different colours in the mongoose selectors show which individuals are present and which have data recorded from them already, the screenshot below is the section where they record relationships between the adult females (at the top) and adult males that may be guarding – or pestering them (below). At the same time, they need to be able to record events that may be occurring with the pack as a whole – in this case an interaction with another pack of mongeese.

Screenshot_2014-06-26-11-34-40

Codeclub and Bioinformatics

I’m swatting up on my scratch skills for the first codeclub at Troon Primary School in Cambourne tomorrow afternoon! It’s exciting to finally head to the frontlines of algorithmic literacy in education.

codeclub

Also on Wednesday I present at talk about FoAM and cross-disciplinary working at Exeter University’s Biomedical Informatics Hub, I’ll be talking about Borrowed Scenery, The Lobster DorisMap, Hapstar and Lirec, specifically concentrating on things that happen when people work together across many disciplines.

Doris: Lobster mapping

A new project, coming from Borrowed Scenery’s Zizim project, converted into a scientific research tool in collaboration with the College of Life and Environmental Sciences at Exeter University and Helsinki University. Doris is named after the sea nymph from Greek mythology, and will be used for mapping Lobster catches on fishing boats so researchers working at the National Lobster Hatchery in Padstow can easily build up a picture of how the animal’s condition relates to location, sea conditions and tide.

Here is an initial plan for how the thing will work:

The main complexities include locating open data sources for sea states and tides and creating an interface that works easily enough on a small fishing boat under various weather conditions – for example touch screens aren’t much use if you’re wearing gloves. Approaches to try include using the physical buttons, shaking, or voice input. As with previous FoAM projects Boskoi and Zizim, this will be built on the Ushahidi platform. Source repo location to follow…