Tag Archives: free software

Users > “drivers” of software

I’ve finally had a chance to sit down and comment on John Naughton’s article in the Guardian and it’s manifesto addressed to the education secretary The Rt Hon Michael Gove MP on computer education in the UK. This joins an avalanche of recognition that programming – or “coding” – is suddenly a Good Thing for People To Know.

It is wonderful to read a major media publication pouring scorn on the old idea that “computers are like cars”, “users are drivers” which has dogged perceptions of computers for years. There is a new philosophy here focusing on hacking, in the original sense – an algorithmic literacy of processes which now mediate every aspect of our lives. This is seen as good as a general life skill, and of course good for the economy for encouraging the kind of independent thinking needed for successful startup companies.

This avalanche has to be credited to some extent to game designer David Braben and his Raspberry Pi project, and an extensive PR campaign tweaking people’s memories (including an increasing number of politicians in their 30′s and 40′s) who remember school computers like the BBC micro, and their later influence on what these same politicians like to call the “creative industries”. This of course all seems instinctively good sense for those of us who have been closely watching the boom in popularity of arduino, processing and free software methodologies in hacklabs and fablabs.

However, an approach organised on this scale is unlikely to support such generalist and creative philosophies we are used to. A few days prior to this article we had an announcement of £575m for kitting out schools with computing infrastructure from familiar public sector contractors including Serco and Capita, and a bit more detail on Staffordshire county council who are spending £28m on “Apple products under the iOS lot including iMacs, Mac Books, iPods, iPads, Mac Minis and Lion Server.”

The problem here is that a rejection of “users as drivers” is a rejection of iOS (and to a lesser extent Android) and the app store philosophy. App stores are extremely successful at promoting the idea of phones as appliances (never computers in their own right) and software as small digestible “apps” encapsulated in locked down environments generally marketed as a kind of protection for users. If these models of computing are to grow as expected – they are completely at odds with an accessible understanding we need for this change in education approach, and the creative literacy of algorithms which would follow.

When I’ve interviewed graduates for creative programming jobs the thing which is really most valuable (much more so than knowing the relevant programming language) is exactly the thing that having an “edit source code” button on every app would encourage (as included on OLPC’s sugar, another older example of an education targeted effort). What is needed is a creative lack of respect for software, a cheerful abandonment of the fear that “breaking something” will be your fault rather than that of the system.