Tag Archives: lisp

A 6502 lisp compiler, sprite animation and the NES/Famicom

For our new project “what remains”, we’re regrouping the Naked on Pluto team to build a game about climate change. In the spirit of the medium being the message, we’re interested in long term thinking as well as recycling e-waste – so in keeping with a lot of our work, we are unraveling the threads of technology. The game will run on the NES/Famicom console, which was originally released by Nintendo in 1986. This hardware is extremely resilient, the solid state game cartridges still work surprisingly well today, compared to fragile CDROM or the world of online updates. Partly because of this, a flourishing scene of new players are now discovering them. I’m also interested that the older the machine you write software for, the more people have access to it via emulators (there are NES emulators for every mobile device, browser and operating system).

nes
Our NES with everdrive flashcart and comparatively tiny sdcard for storing ROMs.

These ideas combine a couple of previous projects for me – Betablocker DS also uses Nintendo hardware and although much more recent, the Gameboy DS has a similar philosophy and architecture to the NES. As much of the machines of this era, most NES games were written in pure assembly – I had a go at this for the Speccy a while back and while being fun in a mildly perverse way, it requires so much forward planning it doesn’t really encourage creative tweaking – or working collaboratively. In the meantime, for the weavingcodes project I’ve been dabbling with making odd lisp compilers, and found it very productive – so it makes sense to try one for a real processor this time, the 6502.

The NES console was one of the first to bring specialised processors from arcade machines into people’s homes. On older/cheaper 8 bit machines like the Speccy, you had to do everything on the single CPU, which meant most of the time was spent drawing pixels or dealing with sound. On the NES there is a “Picture Processing Unit” or PPU (a forerunner to the modern GPU), and an “Audio Processing Unit” or APU. As in modern consoles and PCs, these free the CPU up to orchestrate a game as a whole, only needing to sporadically update these co-processors when required.

You can’t write code that runs on the PPU or APU, but you can access their memory indirectly via registers and DMA. One of the nice things we can do if we’re writing a language for a compiling is building optimised calls that do specific jobs. One area I’ve been thinking about a lot is sprites – the 64 8×8 tiles that the PPU draws over the background tiles to provide you with animated characters.

spriteemu
Our sprite testing playpen using graphics plundered from Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished.

The sprites are controlled by 256 bytes of memory that you copy (DMA) from the CPU to the PPU each frame. There are 4 bytes per sprite – 2 for x/y position, 1 for the pattern id and another for color and flipping control attributes. Most games made use of multiple sprites stuck together to get you bigger characters, in the example above there are 4 sprites for each 16×16 pixel character – so it’s handy to be able to group them together.

Heres an example of the the compiler code generation to produce the 6502 assembly needed to animate 4 sprites with one command by setting all their pattern IDs in one go – this manipulates memory which is later sent to the PPU.

(define (emit-animate-sprites-2x2! x)
  (append
   (emit-expr (list-ref x 2)) ;; compiles the pattern offset expression (leaves value in register a)
   (emit "pha")               ;; push the resulting pattern offset onto the stack
   (emit-expr (list-ref x 1)) ;; compile the sprite id expression (leaves value in a again)
   (emit "asl")               ;; *=2 (shift left)      
   (emit "asl")               ;; *=4 (shift left) - sprites are 4 bytes long, so = address
   (emit "tay")               ;; store offset calculation in y
   (emit "iny")               ;; +1 to get us to the pattern id byte position of the first sprite
   (emit "pla")               ;; pop the pattern memory offset back from the stack
   (emit "sta" "$200,y")      ;; sprite data is stored in $200, so add y to it for the first sprite
   (emit "adc" "#$01")        ;; add 1 to a to point to the next pattern location
   (emit "sta" "$204,y")      ;; write this to the next sprite (+ 4 bytes)
   (emit "adc" "#$0f")        ;; add 16 to a to point to the next pattern location
   (emit "sta" "$208,y")      ;; write to sprite 2 (+ 8 bytes)
   (emit "adc" "#$01")        ;; add 1 to a to point to the final pattern location
   (emit "sta" "$20c,y")))    ;; write to sprite 4 (+ 12 bytes)

The job of this function is to return a list of assembler instructions which are later converted into machine code for the NES. It compiles sub-expressions recursively where needed and (most importantly) maintains register state, so the interleaved bits of code don't interfere with each other and crash. (I learned about this stuff from Abdulaziz Ghuloum's amazing paper on compilers). The stack is important here, as the pha and pla push and pop information so we can do something completely different and come back to where we left off and continue.

The actual command is of the form:

(animate-sprites-2x2 sprite-id pattern-offset)

Where either arguments can be sub-expressions of their own, eg.:

(animate-sprites-2x2 sprite-id (+ anim-frame base-pattern))

This code uses a couple of assumptions for optimisation, firstly that sprite information is stored starting at address $200 (quite common on the NES as this is the start of user memory, and maps to a specific DMA address for sending to the PPU). Secondly there is an assumption how the pattern information in memory is laid out in a particular way. The 16 byte offset for the 3rd sprite is simply to allow the data to be easy to see in memory when using a paint package, as it means the sprites sit next to each other (along with their frames for animation) when editing the graphics:

spritepatternoffset

You can find the code and documentation for this programming language on gitlab.

3D warp weighted loom simulation

One of the main objectives of the weavecoding project is to provide a simulation of the warp weighted loom to use for demonstrations and exploration of ancient weaving techniques. Beyond the 4 shaft loom dyadic calculator we need to show the actual process of weaving to explain how the structures and patterns emerge. Weaving is very much a 3D process and these visualisations fail to show that well. It also needs to be able to be driven by the flotsam tangible livecoding hardware so running on a Raspberry Pi is another requirement.

Sketch and rendering

I’ve decided to make use of the Jellyfish procedural renderer to build something fast and flexible enough, while remaining cross platform. Jellyfish is a lisp-like language which compiles to a vector processing virtual machine written in C++, and approaches speeds of native code (with no garbage collection) while remaining very creative to work with, similar to fluxus livecoding. Previously I’ve only used it for small experiments rather than production like this, so I’ve needed to tighten up the compiler quite a bit. One of the areas which needed work (along with function arguments which were coming out backwards!) were the conditional statements, which I removed and replaced with a single if. Here is the compiler code at the lowest level which emits all the instructions required:

;; compiler code to output a list of instructions for (if pred true-expr false-expr)
(define (emit-if x)
  (let ((tblock (emit-expr (caddr x))) ;; compile true expression to a block
        (fblock (emit-expr (cadddr x)))) ;; compile false expression to block
    (append
     (emit-expr (cadr x)) ;; predicate - returns true or false
     (emit (vector jmz (+ (length tblock) 2) 0)) ;; if false skip true block
     tblock
     (emit (vector jmr (+ (length fblock) 1) 0)) ;; skip false block
     fblock)))

Then I can implement cond (which is a list of different options to check rather than one) as a purely syntactic form with a pre-processor function to create a series of nested ifs before compiling them:

;; preprocessor to take a cond list and convert to nested ifs 
(define (preprocess-cond-to-if x)
  (define (_ l)
    (cond
      ((null? l) 0)          ;; a cond without an else returns 0 
      ((eq? (caar l) 'else)  ;; check for else clause to do
          (cons 'do (pre-process (cdr (car l)))))
      (else (list 'if (pre-process (caar l)) ;; build an if
          (cons 'do (pre-process (cdr (car l))))
                  (_ (cdr l)))))) ;; keep going
  (_ (cdr x))) ;; ignores the 'cond'

Here’s an example of the if in use in the loom simulation at the ‘top’ level – it gets the current weaving draft value for the weft and warp thread position and uses it to move the weft polygons forward or back (in the z) a tiny amount to show up on the correct side of the warp.

(define calc-weft-z
    (lambda ()
        (set! weft-count (+ weft-count 1))
        (set! weft-z
              (if (> (read-draft) 0.5)
                  (vector 0 0 0.01)
                  (vector 0 0 -0.01)))))

One of the reasons I’m writing about all these levels of representation is that they feel close to the multiple representations present in weaving from draft to heddle layout, lift plan, fabric structure and resulting pattern.

Procedural landscape demo on OUYA/Android

A glitchy procedural, infinite-ish landscape demo running on Android and OUYA. Use the left joystick to move around on OUYA, or swiping on Android devices with touchscreens. Here’s the apk, and the source is here.

Screenshot_2014-01-06-07-18-45

It’s great to be able to have a single binary that works across all these devices – from OUYA’s TV screen sizes to phones, and using the standard gesture interface at the same time as the OUYA controller.

The graphics are programmed in Jellyfish Lisp, using Perlin noise to create the landscape. The language is probably still a bit too close to the underlying bytecode in places, but the function calling is working and it’s getting easier to write and experiment with the code.

(define terrain
  '(let ((vertex positions-start)
         (flingdamp (vector 0 0 0))
         (world (vector 0 0 0)))

     ;; recycle a triangle which is off the screen
     (define recycle 
       (lambda (dir)         
         ;; shift along x and y coordinates:
         ;; set z to zero for each vertex
         (write! vertex       
                 (+ (*v (read vertex) 
                        (vector 1 1 0)) dir))
         (write! (+ vertex 1) 
                 (+ (*v (read (+ vertex 1)) 
                        (vector 1 1 0)) dir))
         (write! (+ vertex 2) 
                 (+ (*v (read (+ vertex 2)) 
                        (vector 1 1 0)) dir))

         ;; get the perlin noise values for each vertex
         (let ((a (noise (* (- (read vertex) world) 0.2)))
               (b (noise (* (- (read (+ vertex 1)) 
                               world) 0.2)))
               (c (noise (* (- (read (+ vertex 2))
                               world) 0.2))))

           ;; set the z coordinate for height
           (write! vertex 
                   (+ (read vertex) 
                      (+ (*v a (vector 0 0 8)) 
                         (vector 0 0 -4))))
           (write! (+ vertex 1) 
                   (+ (read (+ vertex 1)) 
                      (+ (*v b (vector 0 0 8)) 
                         (vector 0 0 -4))))
           (write! (+ vertex 2) 
                   (+ (read (+ vertex 2)) 
                      (+ (*v c (vector 0 0 8)) 
                         (vector 0 0 -4))))

           ;; recalculate normals
           (define n (normalise 
                      (cross (- (read vertex)
                                (read (+ vertex 2)))
                             (- (read vertex)
                                (read (+ vertex 1))))))

           ;; write to normal data
           (write! (+ vertex 512) n)
           (write! (+ vertex 513) n)
           (write! (+ vertex 514) n)

           ;; write the z height as texture coordinates
           (write! (+ vertex 1536) 
                   (*v (swizzle zzz a) (vector 0 5 0)))          
           (write! (+ vertex 1537) 
                   (*v (swizzle zzz b) (vector 0 5 0)))          
           (write! (+ vertex 1538) 
                   (*v (swizzle zzz c) (vector 0 5 0))))))

     ;; forever
     (loop 1
       ;; add inertia to the fling/gamepad joystick input
       (set! flingdamp (+ (* flingdamp 0.99)
                          (*v
                           (read reg-fling)
                           (vector 0.01 -0.01 0))))

       (define vel (* flingdamp 0.002))
       ;; update the world coordinates
       (set! world (+ world vel))

       ;; for each vertex
       (loop (< vertex positions-end)         

         ;; update the vertex position
         (write! vertex (+ (read vertex) vel))
         (write! (+ vertex 1) (+ (read (+ vertex 1)) vel))
         (write! (+ vertex 2) (+ (read (+ vertex 2)) vel))

         ;; check for out of area polygons to recycle 
         (cond
          ((> (read vertex) 5.0)
           (recycle (vector -10 0 0)))         
          ((< (read vertex) -5.0)
           (recycle (vector 10 0 0))))
         
         (cond
          ((> (swizzle yzz (read vertex)) 4.0)
           (recycle (vector 0 -8 0)))
          ((< (swizzle yzz (read vertex)) -4.0)
           (recycle (vector 0 8 0))))

         (set! vertex (+ vertex 3)))
       (set! vertex positions-start))))

This lisp program compiles to 362 vectors of bytecode at startup, and runs well even on my cheap Android tablet. The speed seems close enough to native C++ to be worth the effort, and it’s much more flexible (i.e. future livecoding/JIT compilation possibilities). The memory layout is shown below, it’s packing executable instructions and model data into the same address space and doesn’t use any memory allocation while it’s running (no garbage collection and not even any C mallocs). The memory size is configurable but the nature of the system is such that it would be possible to put executable data into unused graphics sections (eg. normals or vertex colours), if appropriate.

jvm