Tag Archives: teaching

Tanglebots workshop preparation

It’s workshop time again at Foam Kernow. We’re running a Sonic Kayak development open hacklab with Kaffe Matthews (more on this soon) and a series of tanglebots workshops which will be the finale to the weavingcodes project.

Instead of using my cobbled together homemade interface board, we’re using the pimoroni explorer hat (pro). This comes with some nice features, especially a built in breadboard but also 8 touch buttons, 4 LEDs and two motor drivers. The only downside is that it uses the same power source as the Pi for the motors, so you need to be a little careful as it can reset the Pi if the power draw is too great.

2hat

We have a good stock of recycled e-waste robotic toys we’re going to be using to build with (along with some secondhand lego mindstorms):

toys

Also lots of recycled building material from the amazing Cornwall Scrap Store.

material

In order to keep the workshop balanced between programming and building, and fun for all age groups, we want to use Scratch – rather than getting bogged down with python or similar. In a big improvement to previous versions of the Pi OS, the recent raspbian version (jessie) supports lots of extension hardware including the explorer hat. Things like firing the built in LEDs work ‘out of the box’ like this:

2scratch-led

While the two motor controllers (with speed control!) work like this:

2scratch-motor

The touch buttons were a bit harder to get working as they are not supported by default, so I had to write a scratch driver to do this which you can find here. Once the driver script is running (which launches automatically from the desktop icon), it communicates to scratch over the network and registers the 8 touch buttons as sensors. This means they can be accessed in scratch like so:

2scratch-touch

Teaching at the Düsseldorf Institute for Music and Media

Last week I was kindly invited by Julian Rohrhuber to do a couple of talks and teach a livecoding workshop alongside Jan-Kees van Kampen at the Düsseldorf Institute for Music and Media. Jan-Kees was demoing /mode +v noise a Supercollider chat bot installation using IRC, so it was the perfect opportunity to play test the work-in-progress slubworld project, including the plutonian botzlang language. It also proved a good chance to try using a Raspberry Pi as a LAN game server.

IMG_20130620_163002

There wasn’t enough time to get deeply into botzlang, but we were able to test the text to sound code that Alex has been working on with a good sound system, and the projection of the game world that visualises what is happening based on the Naked on Pluto library installation:

world5

The Raspberry Pi was useful as a dedicated server I could set up beforehand and easily plug into the institutes wireless router. We didn’t need to worry about internet connectivity, and everyone could take part by using a browser pointed at the right IP address. With access to the “superuser” commands from the Naked on Pluto game, the participants had quite a bit of fun making objects and dressing each other up in different items, later making and programming their own bots to say things that were sonified through the speakers.