Tag Archives: ushahidi

Bike Opera – layering sounds in space

New advancements on the the bike opera project with Kaffe Matthews include a brand new mapping tool based on, yes you guessed it – Ushahidi which I’ve been using for a lot of wildly different projects recently. This time the work has been mainly focused in improving the area mapping – adding features for editing polygons so Kaffe can layer her sounds in space:


This work is fairly reusable, as it only concerns changes to the submit_edit_js.php file in the standard Ushahidi install. In the meantime, Kaffe has been collecting sounds from musicians in Porto and building up a work of truly operatic proportions. We keep our fingers crossed that the bike mounted BeagleBoards can cope with all this material!


Doris: Lobster mapping

A new project, coming from Borrowed Scenery’s Zizim project, converted into a scientific research tool in collaboration with the College of Life and Environmental Sciences at Exeter University and Helsinki University. Doris is named after the sea nymph from Greek mythology, and will be used for mapping Lobster catches on fishing boats so researchers working at the National Lobster Hatchery in Padstow can easily build up a picture of how the animal’s condition relates to location, sea conditions and tide.

Here is an initial plan for how the thing will work:

The main complexities include locating open data sources for sea states and tides and creating an interface that works easily enough on a small fishing boat under various weather conditions – for example touch screens aren’t much use if you’re wearing gloves. Approaches to try include using the physical buttons, shaking, or voice input. As with previous FoAM projects Boskoi and Zizim, this will be built on the Ushahidi platform. Source repo location to follow…

Borrowed Scenery tendrils reach out

Some serious connecting work going on with borrowed scenery for joining physical and imaginary worlds together. A new Boskoi database is up and running, giving us a place to put all kinds of story elements and plants found in the city. Boskoi uses the Ushahidi platform, which provides an API the game is now using to pull all items tagged in the map (which can come from the Android app or web app) into the game where they can interact with players or other entities.

More of Theun’s artwork has gone in, including a magician tarot avatar on the left while the three plants in the screenshot above represent those tagged on the map below. Getting everything in the right place (map lat/long coordinates vs game location coordinates and then aligning the map) took a lot of time to get right!